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How is Registered Apprenticeship different from other types of work-based training?

Registered apprenticeship training is distinguished from other types of workplace training by several factors: (1) participants who are newly hired (or already employed) earn wages from employers during training; (2) programs must meet national standards for registration with the U.S. Department of Labor (or federally-recognized State Apprenticeship Offices); (3) programs provide on-the-job learning and job-related technical instruction; (4) on-the-job learning is conducted in the work setting under the direction of one or more of the employer's personnel; and (5) training results in an industry-recognized credential.

What are Registered Apprenticeships?

Registered Apprenticeships are innovative work-based learning and post-secondary earn-and-learn models that meet national standards for registration with the U.S. Department of Labor (or federally recognized State Apprenticeship Offices).

What do I receive upon completion of a Registered Apprenticeship program?

 After completion of an apprenticeship program, the apprentice earns a nationally recognized credential from the Department of Workforce Solutions Apprenticeship Office (in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Labor Office of Apprenticeship) that is portable and stackable. Additionally, an apprentice, along with earning a paycheck throughout the apprenticeship, is also elevated to journeyworker status that leads to increased pay and upward career opportunities.

Is a Registered Apprenticeship a Job?

Yes, apprentices start working from day one with incremental wage increases as they become more proficient. The average starting wage for an apprentice is approximately $15.28 per hour.

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